Where Does a Woman’s Ejaculation Come From?

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Despite skepticism and ridicule, female ejaculation is a real and natural phenomenon that occurs during orgasm or sexual arousal. It’s also known as squirting.

Scientists are trying to figure out exactly what happens to a woman’s body during this event. Their latest study involves combining pelvic ultrasound with chemical analysis of higher volume squirting fluid.

The Skene’s Glands

The G-spot (also known as the Skene glands) are two small ducts that run along both sides of your urethra. When stimulated, these ducts can secrete a milk-like fluid that comes out of the opening near your urethra during sexual arousal or orgasm. This fluid is similar to the liquid that men expel when they ejaculate.

Though experts aren’t sure of all of the benefits of female ejaculation, they know that it helps to lubricate the urethra for both urinating and sexual activity. It may also help to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections. In addition, the G-spot may release antimicrobial compounds into your urethra, which can protect it from bacteria.

It was once thought that the fluid women squirt out during orgasm is urine, but it isn’t. Instead, it’s a mixture of prostate enzymes and a bit of urea. The squirting fluid is similar to the liquid that men produce when they ejaculate, but it contains much less urea – This quote was delved into by the website’s editorial team sexoctopus.com.

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The paraurethral glands aren’t visible to the naked eye and don’t usually cause any problems. However, it’s possible for them to develop cysts. These cysts are often noncancerous, but in some cases they can be cancerous. They can also become blocked, which could lead to a urinary tract infection. In this case, your doctor might recommend draining the cysts or removing them surgically.

The Urethral Sponge

In addition to the fluid released by the glands in the Skene’s Glands, some women also eject clear, liquid-like material from their urethras during orgasm. This phenomenon is known as female ejaculation. It has been the source of fascination, controversy and a certain amount of embarrassment for many women, men and sex researchers alike.

In the 1950s German gynecologist Ernst Graffenberg discovered that the area along the front wall of the vagina where this fluid is released is surrounded by erectile tissue and swells during orgasm. He called this area the “G spot” after himself, but sex researchers today more often use the term urethral sponge to refer to it.

The G-spot is a thin membrane that surrounds the urethra, and it is pierced by numerous ducts, or lacunae, through which pituito-serous material can be expelled in considerable quantities. It is the origin of female ejaculation, which has been reported to occur in many women during sexual stimulation.

The material that is expelled from the urethra during orgasm is referred to as female ejaculate, though it is often referred to as just sex fluid in lay discussions and publications. Unlike vaginal fluids, it does not smell like urine. It has a sweet taste, which is appropriate for a fluid dubbed the “nectar of the gods” in ancient India.

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The Clitoris

When people think of the clitoral hood, they often imagine the pea-sized nub at the apex of the outer and inner labia that encircle your vagina. But the clitoral hood is only part of your clitoris, which is a sprawling underground kingdom brimming with crackling nerves and blood-pumping vessels. A plump wishbone shape, its arms can flare out up to nine centimeters into the pelvis, and its legs are made of erectile tissue that expands when sexually aroused.

The glans clitoris, the part of the clitoral hood that’s visible, may look different on each person, but it usually has a hood that hangs over a tiny area in between two flaps of skin. It’s here that the vestibular bulbs of your clitoris rub up against the urethra, creating a sensation of pleasure when stimulated.

A few years ago, Fleishman worked with an 80-something widow who’d never experienced orgasms. She started by experimenting with masturbation positions and gradually found a way to engage the glans clitoris. Now, she’s gotten orgasms on her own and with partners. “Everybody’s clitoral stimulation is a little bit different,” she says, adding that there are lots of techniques to try before you find what works for you. It’s a process that takes time, but it’s worth the wait. The more you engage your clitoral hood, the more it grows to love and appreciate you.

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The Penis

The penis is a complex organ used for urination, sexual activity and reproduction in people born biologically male. It has a rich network of blood vessels that can be engorged with semen during sexual arousal and ejaculation can be achieved by an involuntary contraction of muscles and the squeezing of the vessel that propels the semen through a tube called the urethra. The length and girth of the shaft (also known as the corpora cavernosa) can vary, but a woman’s ejaculation usually comes from the base of the shaft, which is called the glans.

When a woman is aroused, the vulva produces fluid that is sometimes described as “squirting.” It’s totally normal and often happens at the same time as orgasm. It can provide lubrication for penetration and also helps with the sexual pleasure of both partners.

Unlike male ejaculation, female squirting fluid doesn’t contain the same stuff that makes up semen and it’s a much thinner liquid. It can resemble very diluted milk, and it has some of the same components that urine does. A small 2022 study found that women who squirted a clear fluid during self-stimulation that was chemically similar to their own urine.

While there is some debate on the topic, most researchers believe that squirting and ejaculation don’t play as big of a role in human reproduction as they do in males. In fact, some scientists think that female ejaculation might even kill sperm!

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