Why My Vagina Burns When I Pee

A Woman Using Her Cellphone While in the Toilet

Painful peeing, or dysuria, isn’t just yucky—it can also be a sign of an infection or health problem. Getting checked out is the only way to know what’s up with your body.

Ob-gyns tell POPSUGAR that UTIs are the most common culprits behind painful peeing, but there are other causes of the symptom, too.

Yeast Infections

Yeast is normal in the mucus membranes that line your genitals. But when the balance of yeast and bacteria is off, as it can be due to stress, pregnancy or certain medicines, yeast can overgrow – This information was researched by the portal team https://sexholes.com. This can cause a whitish-yellowish vaginal discharge that can feel slick or chunky, like cottage cheese. Yeast infections can also make it harder to get a sperm sample during sex.

Bacterial vaginosis is another infection that can throw off the healthy balance of bacteria in your hoo-hah. It can be caused by things like douching, sex and wearing tight or ill-fitting clothes. A bacterial infection of the vulva can also cause itchy, burning skin in the outer genital area. It’s important to talk to your doctor about a BV infection because it could lead to serious complications if left untreated, including infertility.

STIs can also cause pain, itching and burning when you pee. Fortunately, it’s easy to get tested and treated for common STIs today. Your healthcare provider can prescribe an antibiotic for a chlamydia or gonorrhea infection to clear up your symptoms quickly.

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Bacterial Vaginosis

Pain or burning when you urinate can also be caused by a urinary tract infection. These infections (called UTIs) happen when bacteria enter the bladder, urethra or ureters. Symptoms include painful urination and vaginal discharge. Women get these infections more often than men because they have shorter urethras. It’s important to get tested for STIs if you have symptoms of an infection because the most common ones that can cause a burning sensation when you pee are genital herpes, chlamydia and gonorrhea.

If your doctor thinks you have BV, they will do a pelvic exam with their gloved hands to see if you have a fishy-smelling, white or gray discharge. They may also take a sample of your discharge with a swab to send to the lab to see what types of bacteria are in it. Your doctor will probably prescribe antibiotics to take by mouth or an antibiotic gel or cream that you apply inside your vagina. Bacterial vaginosis can recur, but treatment can help prevent it from coming back. You can also take steps to prevent BV, such as using condoms when having sex and not washing your thongs or underwear with detergents that are too strong.

UTI

A urinary tract infection (UTI) can cause a burning sensation when you pee or during sexual intercourse. The symptoms may start suddenly or grow in intensity over time. A UTI can also make you feel like you have to urinate more often or feel the need to urinate even when your bladder is empty. Other signs of a UTI include lower belly pain and cloudy or bloody urine.

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The urinary tract is made up of 2 kidneys and two tubes called ureters, which join the kidneys to the bladder. The job of the urinary tract is to eliminate waste and excess water from the body as urine (wee). Urine goes through the kidneys, ureters, and bladder into the urethra where it exits the body.

Women are more prone to UTIs than men because they have shorter urethras, making it easier for bacteria to reach the bladder. You can prevent UTIs by emptying your bladder often and immediately after sex. You should also drink lots of fluids. And, if you use a diaphragm or unlubricated condoms for birth control, consider switching to another method because they can increase your risk of getting a UTI.

STI

Many everyday products use chemicals that can irritate your vagina. This can cause pain, itching and burning. You may also experience discharge. It’s important to know where the pain or burning is coming from so that you can get the right treatment plan. If the symptoms are only affecting your pelvic area, bladder and vagina, you might not need to see a doctor.

However, if the burning is more specific to your genitals or pubic area, you should visit a nurse or gynecologist. It could be a sign of an infection or an allergic reaction.

STIs like genital herpes, chlamydia and trichomoniasis can all lead to pain during urination. Getting tested and treated for STDs is the only way to know if they’re the cause of your symptoms. Untreated STIs can lead to long-term problems like infertility and can affect your ability to have healthy babies when you become pregnant. Getting regular testing is also important to avoid untreated infections that can cause painful, itching and burning symptoms throughout your life. Getting tested for STIs can be done with a swab or a urine test.

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Kidney Stones

In rare cases, kidney stones can cause burning when you pee. This is due to the fact that when a stone obstructs a ureter, it can stretch and dilate that area. That stretching activates nociceptive nerve fibers in the urethra, bladder and kidney (and genital area in women). The pain then gets referred down the testicle or penis in men or into the vulva and vagina of women.

This can cause severe, sharp pain that is quick to come and go. It can also be accompanied by blood in the urine, fever, chills and vomiting. Kidney stones most often occur in people who have high levels of calcium or oxalate in their urine, which happens with certain metabolic disorders and with some foods like chocolate, nuts and spinach.

To diagnose the problem, your healthcare provider will do a physical exam and order some tests, including blood work to check your kidney function, urine analysis and imaging scans. The treatment for kidney stones depends on their size and location. Small ones may pass or be treated with medication, whereas larger stones can be broken up using a device that sends high-energy shockwaves to the stones.

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