Why Does My Vagina Stink?

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Many women experience itching and burning in the vulva. This can be caused by infections, irritants, and even menopause.

If this is a new symptom, it’s important to see a health care provider right away. The good news is that most of the time, there’s a simple solution. Here are some common causes of vaginal stinging: 1. Allergies.

1. Allergies

Unlike other parts of your body, the vulva and labia can’t hide from allergies like the rest of your skin can. The tissue there is porous and absorbs anything it touches, so if you’re allergic to something — airborne allergens, like pollen, or foods, like nuts — your vagina can react just as your nose or throat would, and the result will likely be a burning sensation.

Itching in the vulva isn’t just unpleasant, it’s also a symptom of an infection or irritation. That itching can signal a variety of conditions, including sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as trichomoniasis and chlamydia, or bacterial vaginosis, which is characterized by a fishy odor, inflammation, and itching – This quote was taken from the website https://tubeallsex.com.

Itching can also be caused by an allergic reaction to feminine hygiene products, douches, spermicides, lotions, soaps, and latex condoms. In some cases, an allergy to a hormone-alternative, such as progestogens or estrogens, can trigger symptoms, too. Usually, a dermatologist or an ob-gyn will be able to tell what’s causing your itching and help you find the right treatment. In some cases, an over-the-counter antihistamine may be enough to ease your itchiness and burning.

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2. STIs

STIs are infections that spread through skin-to-skin contact and may cause a burning sensation in the vagina, penis or mouth. Also known as STDs, they include trichomoniasis (trich), chlamydia, gonorrhea and herpes. They’re most common among people ages 15 to 24 and can be cured with medication.

Other STIs that can cause vaginal irritation are scabies, an infection that causes small bumps, and herpes blisters and sores, which are asymptomatic. If you think an STI is to blame, a health care professional will ask personal questions and take a sample of fluid from the penis, vagina or mouth for testing.

Besides STIs, you can get vaginal itching and burning from products that contain chemical irritants, like perfumed soaps and vaginal sprays or douches. Also, if you’re using condoms or lubricant that makes your skin itch, talk to your health care provider about switching brands or adding more water-soluble lubricant to your regimen. You can also have a urinary tract infection, or UTI, which often leads to vaginal itching and burning when you pee. A UTI is easy to treat with antibiotics.

3. Bacterial Vaginosis

There are a few things that can cause vaginal itching and burning. The most common is bacterial vaginosis (BV). This results when bacteria naturally found in the vagina get out of balance and cause inflammation. It’s most common in women in their reproductive years, but can happen to anyone. It can also be caused by certain activities, including unprotected sex and frequent douching.

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Another cause is yeast infections. These occur when something upsets the normal amount of a type of fungus that usually lives in the vagina, such as antibiotics or pregnancy. It can also be caused by a health condition like diabetes.

If you have symptoms that don’t go away after trying home treatment, see your doctor. They will examine you and may take a sample of your discharge to test for an imbalance in bacteria. They can also give you antibiotics to treat BV. These may come in the form of oral tablets or a cream or gel to apply directly to the vagina. They may need to be repeated if you have recurrent BV.

4. Yeast Infections

Women and men get yeast infections, which are caused by a type of fungus called candida. These infections cause burning, itchiness, pain and discharge that looks thick, white, and clumpy. Yeast infections happen more often in women than men, but both can get them.

Candida is a normal fungus that lives in different places in your body including the mouth and digestive tract, but it can “overgrow” in warm, moist areas like the vagina and cause an infection. Overgrowth can also be caused by a change in your typical bacteria, douching, antibiotics, and other factors.

If you’re experiencing a burning sensation in your vulva and think it might be from one of these things, see a nurse or doctor right away. They can tell you for sure what’s going on and prescribe medicine if needed. It’s especially important to see a nurse or doctor if your symptoms are new or worsen over time. Yeast infections and bacterial vaginosis can be serious for pregnant women, and STIs such as chlamydia, genital herpes, and trichomoniasis can lead to preterm delivery or make it harder to give birth.

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5. Lifestyle Changes

Itching in the vulva can be caused by many things, including infection and external irritation. It can also be a sign of a serious issue like vaginitis or a urinary tract infection (UTI).

The good news is that there are some things you can do to help relieve itching and stinging in the vulva, including using unscented soaps, wearing cotton underwear, and showering right after working out. It’s also important to avoid scented products that are rubbed into the vulva, such as panty liners, sanitary pads, bathing gels, bubble baths, and perfumed toilet paper.

If you’re experiencing itchiness, stinging or burning in your vulva area, it’s important to visit your doctor to rule out any potential issues and get the treatment you need. A gynecologist can assess your symptoms and order tests to find the cause of your pain. You may need a prescription for antibiotics, a vaginal ointment or another medication to treat the problem. Alternatively, you can seek the help of a pelvic floor physiotherapist who can teach you some techniques to strengthen and relax the muscles in your vulva.

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