Why Do My Balls Hurt After Ejaculation?

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A one-time pain after ejaculation is not likely to be cause for alarm, but men who regularly experience this sensation should consult a doctor. A thorough exam and a history will help uncover the cause of this pain.

Many people are concerned that their pain is a sign of something serious like testicular torsion, but this is rarely the case. The most common cause of this pain is called blue balls.

Causes

There are a lot of things that can cause pain in the testicles. Some, like cancer or a hernia in the groin are very serious and require immediate medical attention. Others are less serious and can be relieved with over-the-counter medication. Masturbation is not harmful to your balls if it is done in a clean, hygienic manner and is not excessive. In fact, it is important to masturbate regularly to maintain a healthy erection and reduce the risk of testicular atrophy.

The most common reason a man will experience pain after ejaculation is because of something called “blue balls.” Blue balls are a buildup of semen in the prostate and epididymis (squishy hockey stick sitting on top of and behind the testicle). The pain comes from the pressure of the pooled semen in the area.

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It is important to note that the pain is only after ejaculation and does not occur at any other time. Also, the pain does not increase or decrease in intensity with activity or at rest. This type of pain is often a sign of nothing serious and can be resolved with a little patience.

Other causes of testicular pain include a sports injury or poor posture. It can also be caused by certain medications, like NSAIDs and antidepressants. Pain in one testicle can also be due to a condition called retrograde ejaculation, which is when the semen travels back into the bladder instead of out of the penis. Lastly, varicoceles can cause pain in the scrotum, especially after ejaculation.

Treatment

Premature ejaculation can be a frustrating and embarrassing problem for both men and their partners. Fortunately, this problem is treatable, and there are a number of treatment options available. These treatments include sex therapy, medication and lifestyle changes. The first step in treating PE is to discuss the issue with your doctor. It is important to be frank and open with your doctor when discussing this topic, as it can help them better understand the underlying causes of the problem.

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Medications can be used to delay ejaculation. SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) such as fluoxetine, paroxetine or sertraline, and tricyclic antidepressants like clomipramine are often prescribed for this purpose. Another option is a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, such as tadalafil or sildenafil, which are typically prescribed for ED and can be taken on demand to delay ejaculation.

Psychological counseling may also be recommended. This can be helpful if the issue is caused by anxiety or other mental health issues. Some therapists are specially trained to deal with sexual problems, and can help both the man and his partner address the issue. Behavioral therapy can teach the man ways to avoid ejaculation and how to control his reaction to sexual stimulation. This can help to restore trust and confidence in the relationship. A cream containing lidocaine and prilocaine can be applied to the penis before sexual activity to reduce sensitivity and delay ejaculation.

Prevention

Many men are embarrassed to talk with their health care provider about pain that accompanies ejaculation. But the good news is that it’s normal to experience premature ejaculation from time to time. It usually takes about five minutes from the start of sexual intercourse for a man to ejaculate.

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Pain that accompanies ejaculation can be caused by a number of conditions. These include varicocele, enlarged veins in the scrotum, which can feel like a bag of worms; hydrocele, a swelling of the scrotum; and referred pain, where an injury or disease in another part of the body sends pain to the testicles.

The best way to prevent testicular pain is to practise safe sex by using a condom during all sex encounters, especially during unprotected sex or when changing sexual partners. It’s also important to check the scrotum regularly for any lumps or bumps that could indicate a problem.

A one-time episode of pain after ejaculation is usually nothing to worry about, but it’s important to have any persistent pain or symptoms examined by a doctor to make sure there isn’t an underlying condition that needs treatment. Both Ramin and Khera say that it’s particularly important for men to see a doctor if they’re experiencing pain in both testicles, as this is often a sign of something more serious than just groin strain.

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