How to Have Sex Without Condom

person holding clear drinking glass with yellow liquid

If you’ve had sex without condom—or even if you’ve forgotten to put one on in the heat of the moment or yours broke—it can be scary AF. It could lead to an unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, or both.

Condoms are fantastic inventions that let you have hot and steamy sex while protecting against pregnancy and STDs – These words are from the website’s editor sexoctopus.com. But some people have latex allergies that make them inconvenient to use.

1. Discuss it with your partner

The decision to go condom-free is a big one and should only be considered if both partners agree. It’s important to discuss any risks, like STIs and pregnancy. It’s also important to prioritize getting tested for STIs. Many STIs don’t have symptoms, and they can be spread through unprotected sex.

You should also make sure you have alternative birth control in place to prevent unwanted pregnancy. This could be an implant, IUD or long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) method. If you’re not sure which is right for you, talk to your gynecologist or healthcare provider. They can fit you with an IUD, prescribe Ella (ulipristal acetate) or give you an over-the-counter emergency birth control pill.

Ultimately, it’s up to you and your partner to decide what makes you happy. But you should never take any risks that aren’t necessary for your relationship. If you’re worried about a potential STI infection, you can ask your doctor to recommend post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) as a precautionary measure. PEP is a medication that may help reduce your risk of HIV infection if you become infected with an STI.

Read also:  How to Have Sex Without Getting Caught

2. Be prepared

Ditching condoms doesn’t have to be a deal-breaker, but you should consider the risks. Having sex without a barrier method increases your risk of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). Women who skip the rubber are more likely to get a vaginal infection called bacterial vaginosis. It can cause itching, spotting, painful discharge, and sometimes requires antibiotics to treat. It’s also a major risk factor for HIV infection.

It’s important to discuss this topic with your partner before trying sex without a condom. It should be an open conversation that covers your relationship status, sexual history, and your use of condoms. It’s also a good idea to get regularly screened for STIs. This will allow you to detect an STI early and receive proper treatment before it becomes an infection.

If you do unprotected sex, it’s important to use emergency contraception as soon as your period starts. You can use an IUD, Ella, or one of the over-the-counter emergency birth control pills. These are more effective the sooner you take them, from 12 hours to five days after sex.

3. Be honest

It’s important to discuss how you feel about condom use with your partner before deciding whether or not to stop using them. You want to make sure that your partner is on the same page as you and that it’s a decision that both of you can feel good about.

Read also:  How to Have Sex With a Curved Penis

If you and your partner decide to stop using condoms, it’s also a good idea to make sure you both understand the risks involved in not using a barrier method, like pregnancy or STIs. It’s also a good idea to agree on some clear boundaries and expectations, especially if you’re in a monogamous relationship.

If you’re ready to ditch the rubber, remember that it takes time to create intimacy in a sexually intimate relationship. It’s also important to use other methods of contraception in addition to your condom. And, of course, you should always take an STD test after sex to be sure that you’re not at risk for getting a new infection. STDs are preventable, and condoms are up to 98% effective when used correctly [1]. The most important thing is to be safe.

4. Be open

It’s a big decision to make to ditch condoms. So, it should be something that both you and your partner decide together. But, before you do, be sure to talk about all the pros and cons. It’s a good idea to also discuss alternative forms of contraception and whether or not they’ll work with penetrative sex, because condoms aren’t the only way to protect yourself from unwanted pregnancy and STIs.

Even if you and your partner agree to go condomless, it’s still important to continue communicating about relationship expectations, like whether or not you’re monogamous. This way, if one or both of you starts to feel unsafe and unsure about the relationship, it’s easy to talk about those concerns and end things on good terms.

Read also:  How to Have Slow Sex

Getting intimate without the protection of a barrier method can still be fun and steamy. Plus, you can always add lube to help with the process. Just remember that lube contains chemicals, such as latex, that some people are allergic to. So, if you have a latex allergy, use a non-latex version of your preferred lube.

5. Have fun

For some couples, ditching the rubber is an emotional step toward greater intimacy. This can be especially true for serious couples in long-term relationships. Of course, this only works if your partner doesn’t have a latex allergy and both of you are tested negative for all STIs.

And there’s no reason safer sex can’t be fun. Condoms come in a wide range of colors, textures and materials to increase sensation, and many have special lubricants for extra excitement. There are even internal condoms that stimulate the tip of the penis and vulva and can last longer than regular rubber ones. And of course, you can always use a cock sleeve or sex toy for increased sensual pleasure.

If you decide to ditch the condoms, be sure to make it clear to your partner that you don’t want to take any risks with STIs. Make sure you’re both screened for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and HIV after unprotected sex—and get tested at least once every three months. Getting tested for STIs is simple and quick with a home test or visit your local Planned Parenthood health center.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts